About

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The Marine Corps Gazette: Since 1916, the Professional Journal of U.S. Marines

Mission:

To provide a forum for the exchange of ideas on subjects important to the Corps that will advance technical and tactical knowledge, critical thinking, and the values and ethos of the Marine Corps.

Goal:

The recognition of the Gazette as the preeminent source for professional debate on the most important issues of the Corps and relevance as an integral source for the Corps' leader development and professional growth.

Focus:

The Gazette encourages dialogue among our readers and authors on the most important issues facing the Marine Corps today. The Gazette's content is written by Marines, for Marines. Our authors and readers are primarily today's Marines of all ranks, and we publish articles of various lengths covering all elements of the Marine Air-Ground Task Force and current operations as well as a wide range of Marine Corps- and defense-related topics. We also publish commentary, letters, book reviews, speculative fiction about future war, and tactical decision games and special notices of significant current views. 

Heritage: 

The Marine Corps Gazette was first created by then-Col John A. Lejeune to establish a journal for the Marine Corps Association as the professional organization for all Marines. The first issue was published in March of 1916, and today, we continue to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas as envisioned by Gen Lejeune. In contrast to the Corps’ heritage of disciplined conformity, the one area where we have never mandated conformity is in our thinking. Marines of all ranks are encouraged to read broadly on professional subjects, think critically, and express their opinions clearly. Professionals can always tactfully disagree, and for over a century, the pages of the Gazette have provided the authoritative source for this debate to enhance the intellectual health of the Corps.  

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